Patient-associated Features and Breast Cancer (Ongoing)

Posted On 2020-08-19 11:35:51



This series on Patient-associated Features and Breast Cancer is edited by Dr. Danila Coradini from Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, University of Milan, Italy

Danila Coradini, PhD
Laboratory of Medical Statistics and Biometry, Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, University of Milan, Italy

Danila Coradini is a cellular and molecular biologist with a 40-year long experience in basic and translational studies on breast cancer.

Senior Investigator at the Experimental Oncology Department of the Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori in Milan, she was the leader of a team of preclinical investigators whose main interest was to elucidate the biological basis of breast cancer sex hormones-dependence and identify potential prognostic and predictive biomarkers useful in clinical practice. At the same time, she was the principal investigator in a series of funded projects aimed at investigating the pharmacological potential, as anticancer drugs, of a series of compounds including new synthetic antiestrogens, biological modifiers such interferons, retinoids, and epigenetic regulators such histone deacetylation inhibitors. More recently, she focused on the prognostic/predictive role of gene expression profile using a microarray technique.

Since 2008, she collaborates with the biostatistician and bioinformatics team at the Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health of the University of Milan as a translational biologist. Taking advantage of the information provided by new high-throughput technologies, she started exploring the earliest events occurring in breast carcinogenesis with particular attention for the crosstalk between the mammary epithelial compartment and the surrounding stroma (especially the adipose tissue). At the same time, she studies the prognostic and predictive role of some patient-associated features such as adiposity and hormonal milieu (in particular, circulating sex hormones).

Series outline:

1. Editorial: the emerging role of patient-associated features on breast development and treatment
2. Metabolic Syndrome and Breast Cancer

  2.1. Metabolic Syndrome and Breast Cancer Risk
  2.2. Obesity and Breast Cancer Risk
  2.3. Insulin Resistance and Breast Cancer Risk
  2.4. Serum lipids, Lipoproteins and Breast Cancer Risk
  2.5. Metabolic Syndrome and Breast Cancer Diagnosis and Prognosis
  2.6. Obesity, Inflammation and Breast Cancer
  2.7. Obesity, Inflammation and Breast Cancer Prognosis
  2.8. Serum lipids, Lipoproteins and Breast Cancer Prognosis
  2.9. Insulin Resistance and Breast Cancer Prognosis
  2.10. Metabolic Syndrome and Breast Cancer Treatment
3. Adipokines and Breast Cancer
  3.1. Adiposity, Adipokines and Breast Cancer
  3.2. Adipokines and Breast Cancer Risk
  3.3. Adipokines and Breast Cancer Diagnosis and Prognosis
  3.4. Adiposity and Breast Cancer Treatment
  3.5. Adipokines as Target of Therapy
4. Cholesterol, Oxysterol Metabolites and Breast Cancer
  4.1. Cholesterol Metabolism and Breast Cancer
  4.2. Cholesterol, Oxysterol Metabolites and Breast Cancer Treatment
  4.3. Cholesterol, Oxysterol Metabolites as Target of Therapy
5. Circulating Sex Hormones, SHBG and Breast Cancer
  5.1. Circulating Sex Hormones, SHBG and Breast Cancer Risk
  5.2. Circulating Sex Hormones and Breast Cancer Prognosis
6. Local Biosynthesis of Sex Hormones and Breast Cancer
  6.1. Local Biosynthesis of Sex Hormones and Breast Cancer Risk and Prognosis
  6.2. Local Biosynthesis of Sex Hormones and Breast Cancer Treatment

Disclosure:
The series “Patient-associated Features and Breast Cancer” was commissioned by the editorial office, Annals of Breast Surgery without any sponsorship or funding. Dr. Danila Coradini is serving as the unpaid Guest Editor for the series.